galvanist - It's a wiggle.

x-a-z-a-x:

Tried some wargames for breakfast… It’s a pretty fun way to learn. Have to keep doing this.

ssh bandit.labs.overthewire.org -lbandit0 "cat readme"
ssh bandit.labs.overthewire.org -lbandit1 "cat ./-"
ssh bandit.labs.overthewire.org -lbandit2 "cat spaces in this filename'"
ssh bandit.labs.overthewire.org -lbandit3 "cat inhere/.hidden"

I only made it to level 4 before I returned to tumblr though…

That was fun. It took me about 30 minutes to get to the level24 read me (and remove someone’s cheat file — tsk tsk). Nothing was too hard and nothing much was accomplished, but the same can be said about a crossword or sudoku puzzle. A nice diversion.

On to leviathan!


lsof

On OS X you wanna use sudo lsof -nP -iTCP -sTCP:LISTEN. The output looks like this:

$ sudo lsof -nP -iTCP -sTCP:LISTEN
COMMAND     PID   USER   FD   TYPE             DEVICE SIZE/OFF NODE NAME
launchd       1   root   23u  IPv6 0xf01241af1b915325      0t0  TCP *:5900 (LISTEN)
launchd       1   root   24u  IPv4 0xf01241af1b91732d      0t0  TCP *:5900 (LISTEN)
launchd       1   root   28u  IPv6 0xf01241af1b914ee5      0t0  TCP [::1]:631 (LISTEN)
launchd       1   root   29u  IPv4 0xf01241af1b916b45      0t0  TCP 127.0.0.1:631 (LISTEN)
launchd       1   root   31u  IPv6 0xf01241af1b914aa5      0t0  TCP *:22 (LISTEN)
launchd       1   root   32u  IPv4 0xf01241af1b91f32d      0t0  TCP *:22 (LISTEN)
mtmfs        55   root    4u  IPv4 0xf01241af1b91eb45      0t0  TCP 127.0.0.1:49152 (LISTEN)
mtmfs        55   root    6u  IPv4 0xf01241af1d38cb45      0t0  TCP 127.0.0.1:49153 (LISTEN)
ssh       45193 username    5u  IPv6 0xf01241af1b9128a5      0t0  TCP [::1]:8000 (LISTEN)
ssh       45193 username    6u  IPv4 0xf01241af2405eb45      0t0  TCP 127.0.0.1:8000 (LISTEN)

netstat

On many types of Linux you can use lsof, but also sudo netstat -tulpn. The output looks like this:

$ sudo netstat -tulpn
Active Internet connections (only servers)
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address           Foreign Address         State       PID/Program name
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:53863           0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      1052/rpc.statd  
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:3306          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      1257/mysqld     
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:111             0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      969/rpcbind     
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:80              0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      3776/apache2    
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:53            0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      1972/dnsmasq    
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:22              0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      667/sshd        
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:631           0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      773/cupsd       
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:50521           0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      -               
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:25            0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      1441/master     
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:6010          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      20480/3         
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:6011          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      6235/11         
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:53698         0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      26658/7         
udp        0      0 127.0.0.1:53            0.0.0.0:*                           1972/dnsmasq    
udp        0      0 0.0.0.0:68              0.0.0.0:*                           1924/dhclient   
udp        0      0 0.0.0.0:111             0.0.0.0:*                           969/rpcbind     
udp        0      0 10.0.0.64:123       0.0.0.0:*                           2576/ntpd       
udp        0      0 127.0.0.1:123           0.0.0.0:*                           2576/ntpd       
udp        0      0 0.0.0.0:123             0.0.0.0:*                           2576/ntpd       
udp        0      0 0.0.0.0:713             0.0.0.0:*                           969/rpcbind     
udp        0      0 127.0.0.1:804           0.0.0.0:*                           1052/rpc.statd  
udp        0      0 0.0.0.0:42123           0.0.0.0:*                           1052/rpc.statd

I’ve never really gotten into Zippy as a comic strip, unlike many of the co-workers at my first I.T. job. But I usually enjoy a good zippy non sequitur in my fortunes. Since my LAST POST was mostly ZIPPY FORMAT, I figured it would be a GOOD THING to put up a LINK TO TH’ SITE!


The DMV has approximately 650 programs written in Assembler language running under Real Time Control (RTC), […] These programs support the department’s primary business functions of licensing of driver’s privilege, occupational licensing and registration of vehicles. […] The department is rapidly losing the expertise of Assembler programmers due to an aging workforce. Assembler is an obsolete programming language by industry standards. It is difficult to recruit trained individuals for this legacy RTC platform and for batch processes as well. DMV is seeking technical expertise from the private sector in converting Assembler code to COBOL code using automated tools, code converters.

State of California, in RFI ISD13-0209

YES! We need a NON-OBSOLETE language which isn’t dominated by an aging workforce… like 55-year-old COBOL! and we need it TRANSLATED from assembly… BY AUTOMATED TOOLS! The California Department of Motor Vehicles will soon be FUTURE-PROOF!


The lower case letter “z” from Mark Simonson’s excellent free open source monospace font Anonymous Pro, one of my two preferred code editor / terminal fonts.

The other is Source Code Pro by Paul Hunt (of Adobe), which is also a free and open source monospace font.

They make a notable difference in my daily computerizing happiness levels.

The lower case letter “z” from Mark Simonson’s excellent free open source monospace font Anonymous Pro, one of my two preferred code editor / terminal fonts.

The other is Source Code Pro by Paul Hunt (of Adobe), which is also a free and open source monospace font.

They make a notable difference in my daily computerizing happiness levels.


A photo of a “Computer Condition” control on the analog computer driving the Nike missile system located at the Nike Missile Site in Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

The have an open house on the first Saturday of each month, which is free and absolutely fascinating. You can meet and talk at length with veterans who oversaw, operated, and maintained these systems during every distinct era of the cold war. You can look inside restored systems, ask questions, touch the controls (in some cases), and watch the missiles move from the underground storage bunker into lauch position.

A photo of a “Computer Condition” control on the analog computer driving the Nike missile system located at the Nike Missile Site in Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

The have an open house on the first Saturday of each month, which is free and absolutely fascinating. You can meet and talk at length with veterans who oversaw, operated, and maintained these systems during every distinct era of the cold war. You can look inside restored systems, ask questions, touch the controls (in some cases), and watch the missiles move from the underground storage bunker into lauch position.


It turned out that people’s actual definition of “expert” is “a credentialed person who agrees with me.” For instance, when the researcher’s results underscored the dangers of climate change, people who tended to worry about climate change were 72 percentage points more likely to agree that the researcher was a bona fide expert. When the same researcher with the same credentials was attached to results that cast doubt on the dangers of global warming, people who tended to dismiss climate change were 54 percentage points more likely to see the researcher as an expert.
How politics makes us stupid by Ezra Klein for Vox

From jamie flournoy’s answer:

Create the directory, inside it add a .gitignore with this content:

# Ignore everything in this directory
*
# Except this file
!.gitignore

humanoidhistory:


World War I bunker in France.


Sweet Jesus. This is NOT in France. This is in Belgium at Hill 60.

humanoidhistory:

World War I bunker in France.

Sweet Jesus. This is NOT in France. This is in Belgium at Hill 60.


I’d like one of these or one of these


The Republican members of the committee made it clear that not only do they lack the slightest interest in addressing climate change but they are about as ignorant about the nuances of science as a stone. Leading the charge was Texas congressman Randy Weber:
 
Several members, for example, appeared to be trying to mock rather than engage Holdren on climate change. “I may want to get your cellphone number, Dr. Holdren,” said Representative Randy Weber (R–TX), “because, if we go through another few cycles of global warming and cooling, I may need to ask you when I should buy my long coat on sale.”
 
Weber, a freshman from the Galveston area, began his interrogation by asking Holdren whether “when you guys do your research, you start with a scientific postulate or theory and work forward from that? Is that right?” Holdren gamely played along, explaining that “it depends on the type of science, but the notion of posing a hypothesis and then trying to determine whether it is right is one of the tried and true approaches in science, yes.”
 
But Weber’s question was really just a setup for his concluding statement. “I just don’t know how you all prove those theories going back 50 or 100,000 or even millions of years,” Weber said.

Perhaps Weber also wants to discount theories in astronomy, cosmology and paleontology? After all even those theories are based on evidence going back millions of years. I don’t know Weber’s views on evolution but I would be hardly surprised if he turns out to be in favor of “teaching the controversy”.


Background

About a week ago, I made a post about the sad state of direction search on Duck Duck Go. In that post “mountain view, ca to berkeley, ca” gave me nothing useful, while that kinda search on google is extremely useful. After writing that post and attending the recent AWS summit in San Francisco, I started thinking about how hard it would actually be to implement a good response to a direction search query on DDG. That’s when I found out about DuckDuckHack:

Anyone in the world can help improve the search experience on DuckDuckGo. Whether you can code or not, there are many ways for you to contribute. You can get started by suggesting new instant answers to the community, recommending better data sources, or actually hacking away on your own instant answer.

Sounds supercool. I’m going to take a crack at this. I see bloom filters and highly optimized string libraries in my future. My first step is to get some data… namely names… of places.

Some Data Sources

USGS USBoGN Place-iest Places

To take my loader for a quick test-drive, I extracted this list of the places that appear most frequently in the downloadable USGS USBoGN domestic data for all (60?) states.

In the following table I’ve linked the place name to the corresponding wikipedia article.

More Informative HTML Table View

Count Place ID Place Name
15 1008807 Atlantic Ocean
14 205110 Appalachian National Scenic Trail
11 801970 Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail
10 1629903 Mississippi River
10 120697 Intracoastal Waterway
8 1783507 Great Lakes
8 165345 Tennessee Valley Divide
8 1023842 Blue Ridge
7 756398 Missouri River
6 469028 Great Plains
6 425264 Ohio River
6 2087988 Great Basin
5 558730 Gulf of Mexico
5 480171 High Plains
5 247074 Pacific Ocean
5 205015 Continental Divide

Tumblr-Timeline-Readable Lame List


architectureofdoom:

nock-nock-nock:

Andreas Gursky

"Kamiokande" 2007

Super-Kamiokande, a neutrino observatory in the city of Hida, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. The observatory was designed to search for proton decay, study solar and atmospheric neutrinos, and keep watch for supernovas in the Milky Way Galaxy.

SuperK!

(Source: www-sk.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp)


During a Pacific storm on 10 January 1992, three 40-foot containers holding 29,000 “Friendly Floatees” plastic bath toys from a Chinese factory were washed off a ship. Two-thirds of the ducks floated south and landed three months later on the shores of Indonesia, Australia, and South America. The remaining 10,000 ducks headed north to Alaska and then completed a full circle back near Japan, caught up in the North Pacific Gyre current as the so-called Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Many of the ducks then entered the Bering Strait between Alaska and Russia and were trapped in the Arctic ice. They moved through the ice at a rate of one mile per day, and in 2000 they were sighted in the North Atlantic. The movement of the ducks had been monitored by American oceanographer Curtis Ebbesmeyer. Bleached by sun and seawater, the ducks and beavers had faded to white, but the turtles and frogs had kept their original colours.

Between July and December 2003, The First Years Inc. offered a $100 US savings bond reward to anybody who recovered a Floatee in New England, Canada or Iceland. More of the toys were recovered in 2004 than in any of the preceding three years. However, still more of these toys were predicted to have headed eastward past Greenland and make landfall on the southwestern shores of the United Kingdom in 2007.

These ducks were the subject of Donovan Hohn’s 2011 book Moby-Duck: The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost at Sea.

Can we please have this story in the form of a Pixar short film?


Photo reblogged from Fox & Thomas with tags:
art
ideefixedujour:

Der schweigende Stern / SF 1960 by sticknobills on Flickr.